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What is difference between 1310nm and 1550nm?

In standard Singlemode cable assembly, the two wavelengths used for Insertion Loss testing are 1310nm and 1550nm.  All Singlemode fibers work very similarly in either wavelength—that is, you don’t need to buy fiber based on wavelength, one fiber fits all.   So, IF your cable assembly is built properly, with good materials and good techniques, the Insertion Loss values for any given connector should be very similar when tested at either 1310 or 1550.

This leads some producers to test their products with just one wavelength,  testing both wavelengths only if the customer specifically requires it.   Testing in both wavelengths requires additional equipment and can seem to some as nothing more than a “necessary evil”.   But there are benefits to making it standard practice to test ALL fiberoptic cable assemblies at both 1310 and 1550:   the Insertion Loss variation between 1310nm and 1550nm test wavelengths can be very helpful in identifying serious problems with the product and / or process.

Use 1550nm/1310nm SFP Over MMF or 850nm SFP Over SMF?

One helpful tip for troubleshooting any Single mode Insertion Loss testing issue with your product is to remember the following:

  • 1310nm is more sensitive to alignment problems
  • 1550nm is more sensitive to fiber bending problems

What are the differences between 1310nm and 1550nm optical module?

1. The wavelength is different. One wavelength is 1310nm and the other is 1550nm.

2. Dispersion and loss are different. In the actual application process, the link loss of the 1310nm optical module is generally calculated at 0.35dBm/km, and the link loss of the 1550nm optical module is generally calculated at 0.20dBm/km. The calculation of the dispersion value is very complicated and is generally only for reference.

3. Different uses. The 1310nm and 1550nm bands are mostly used for medium and long-distance transmission, of which 1310nm (SM, single mode, large loss during transmission but small dispersion, generally used for transmission within 40KM), 1550nm (SM, single mode, low loss during transmission but small Large dispersion, generally used for long-distance transmission above 40KM, the farthest can directly transmit 120KM without relay).

Taking into account the different transmission loss and dispersion in the optical fiber, generally the same transmission rate and different working wavelength optical modules correspond to different transmission distances, and the receiving and emitting power may not match. The more important reason is that the carrier wavelength is inconsistent and signal demodulation is possible. There will be problems.


Can optical modules with wavelengths of 1310nm and 1550nm be connected?

 
Taking into account the different transmission loss and dispersion in the optical fiber, generally the same transmission rate and different working wavelength optical modules correspond to different transmission distances, and the receiving and emitting power may not match. The carrier wavelength is not consistent, and signal demodulation may be problematic.

Why wavelength 1550 nm and 1310 nm are usually being used in optical transmission system?

Typically multi-mode glass fibers use light at 850 nm – 1300nm, referred to as “short wavelength” and single-mode fiber operates at 1310, or 1550 nm, called “long wavelength”. These wavelengths are used because they have the lowest attenuation rate. These specific wavelengths are in the infrared region.

Is 1310nm single-mode or multimode?
There are three main wavelengths used for fiber optics—850 nm and 1300 nm for multi-mode and 1550 nm for single-mode (1310 nm is also a single-mode wavelength, but is less popular).

Will 1310nm work with 1550nm?
Combining 1310nm with 1550nm for a bi-directional link Since RF over fiber is inherently mono-directional, using a single fiber for a bi-directional link requires the use of more than one wavelength. In this scenario the use of 1310 nm and 1550nm can be combined.

What color is 1310nm?
Blue is the 1310nm module, yellow is the 1550nm module and purple is the 1490nm module. And the color of compatible fiber optic patch cord is yellow. While the color coded bale clasp and color arrow on the label of multimode SFP modules are black and the used fiber optic patch cord is usually orange.

Is 1310nm single mode or multimode?
What is the difference between 1550Nm and 1310nm?
1550nm, 1310nm are for single mode fibers, whereas 1310nm, 850nm are for mulimode fibers. The choice of wavelengths to be used can be derived from two of the most important factors, loss, and dispersion.

What is the difference between 1550 nm and 1310 nm wavelengths?
Both of these should be very low for fiber to propagate large amount of information. 1550 nm provides lowest loss region, whereas 1310 nm provides lowest dispersion. Accordingly light sources at these three wavelengths have been commercialized. These are the wavelenght of the, light source called optical transmitter used in optical communication.

What is the difference between a 1310 and a 1550 cable?
If made properly, the cable assembly will test about the same at either 1310 or 1550. 1550 Insertion Loss results are generally better by a few hundredths of a dB, due to, in part, its lower fiber attenuation. It’s normal that Insertion Loss values for a connector be ~0.01 – 0.05 dB better at 1550 than 1310.

What is the difference between ILS 1310 and ILS 1550?
IL @ 1310 and 1550 similar. If made properly, the cable assembly will test about the same at either 1310 or 1550. 1550 Insertion Loss results are generally better by a few hundredths of a dB, due to, in part, its lower fiber attenuation. It’s normal that Insertion Loss values for a connector be ~0.01 – 0.05 dB better at 1550 than 1310.
IL @ 1310 and 1550 similar
If made properly, the cable assembly will test about the same at either 1310 or 1550.  1550 Insertion Loss results are generally better by a few hundredths of a dB, due to, in part, its lower fiber attenuation.    It’s normal that Insertion Loss values for a connector be ~0.01 - 0.05 dB better at 1550 than 1310.

IL @ 1310 higher than 1550
A connector, or an entire product design, showing a significantly higher Insertion Loss at 1310 than at 1550 indicates a likely problem in core-to-core alignment between the two mated ferrules.   The difference may be small, and indeed may be acceptable.   The larger the misalignment, the more Insertion Loss @ 1310 compared to 1550.   The cause of the misalignment could be due to many factors, most often either contamination on the product and testing components, or poor fiber core-to-ferrule concentricity.

Contamination can hopefully be removed, and the preceding manufacturing process refined to eliminate prior to testing.   Poor concentricity, however, is often the result of using oversized ferrules, and thus the Insertion Loss cannot be improved without replacing the connector.   “Oversized” is relative:   the larger the ferrule hole bore is than the fiber OD, the most the fiber will be able to sit off to the side of ferrule center, and thus the larger the expected Insertion Loss @ 1310.

IL @ 1550 higher than 1310
A connector, or an entire product design, showing a significantly higher Insertion Loss at 1550 than at 1310 indicates the likely presence of a stress point on the fiber somewhere in the cable assembly—most likely a fiber bend that exceeds operating bend radius, or a fiber “pinch” or microbend somewhere within the product.  The higher the stress (larger the bend), the higher the Insertion Loss @ 1550 compared to 1310.   But whereas a core-offset problem mentioned above are often normal results of raw-material selection, any excess stress directly on a fiber represents a serious risk to product reliability, and thus IL values @ 1550 are particularly important to monitor and troubleshoot.

Even with advent of “reduced bend radius” fiber, it is excellent practice to test all products at 1550.    Doing so may identify a serious product flaw, particularly in products which have fiber routed within an enclosure (such as within a cassette or a cabinet or a ribbon fan-out transition).    If your product Insertion Loss @ 1550 is significantly higher than @1310, you very likely have a product with fiber under stress, and you need to understand the cause.

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